Our Travel First Aid Kit

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I’m not ashamed to admit that I am slightly over the top when it comes to first aid supplies. A look inside my handbag reveals more than a packet of bandaids and a few tissues. Instead, you’ll find four EpiPens, about 35 thousand Ventolin puffers, a couple of spacers, enough antihistamine to make the authorities look twice, and usually an elastic bandage in case of snake bite. And that’s just to make a trip to the supermarket.

So when it came time to think about our first aid requirements for our trip, Matt knew it was time to intervene. Although I’m known as the “cure everything with breastmilk and/or coconut oil” lady, I also like to have all my bases covered and be prepared for every eventuality. He is the voice of reason that tells me that I probably don’t need to bring along a whole chemist just in case.

However, although we left with what Matt still considered to be way over the top in terms of our first aid supplies, we’ve used just about everything we brought with us in the past four months. We’re at the point now where we will need to restock a few items in the not too distant future. And I have to say, even I’m a little bit surprised by what we’ve used and what we haven’t.

Touch wood, other than Cai, no one has been seriously hurt or injured so far. Cai of course had the infected mozzie bite and MRSA infection, and also sliced his hand open at Wunjunga in the period we refer to fondly as “4 hospital visits in 2 weeks”. Harper had a suspected ear infection and high temps for a couple of days in the early weeks that was we were able to manage just with pain relief. Mackenzie has escaped pretty much unscathed except for a couple of giant stacks, Matt just about knackered himself on the tow ball the other day and my only real injuries have come from wine in a box.

Here’s a few things we couldn’t do without.

EpiPens and EpiPen trainers

Obviously these guys are our first priority. We don’t go anywhere without them. The Authority prescription from our allergist gives us two at PBS prices and we pay full price for two more. Why carry 4? We’ve heard stories about misfires, EpiPens “blowing” due to extreme temperatures and having to use more than one dose while waiting for emergency services. For us, 4 is a good number to carry. We have the trainer pens so we can explain to people who don’t know about life threatening food allergies how an acute episode is treated and how to use an EpiPen.

Antihistamine

Cai takes a daily dose as well as having an emergency dose as the first line of defence in case of an allergic reaction, and we try to carry at least two months worth with us most times.

Ventolin and small volume spacer

We have 5 puffers stashed in different locations – 2 in Cai’s kit, 1 in the car, 1 in the bag and 1 in the box for easy access in an emergency.

Seretide and large volume spacer

Cai’s regular asthma preventer

Cortisone and Bactroban creams

Steroid and Antibiotic creams for use on Cai’s eczema, and we also use this combo on mozzie bites at times to try to calm the itch and prevent infection.

Various waterproof dressings

Gauze, non-adhesive dressings and Micropor

Syringes for administering Cai’s immunotherapy injections if we get somewhere so remote they don’t have the right size!

Silver shock blankets – you can actually use these in your bedding if it gets stupid cold too.

Elastic bandages – For sprains or snake bites

Triangle sling

Betadine

Saline

Paracetamol (and baby version), ibuprofen, aspirin

Sunscreen

Stingoes

Paw Paw Ointment

Hydralyte – which I forgot I had and could have come in handy after the last wine in a box incident.
Safety pins, spare prescriptions, spare spacer and mask.

What’s in your first aid kit? Anything I’ve forgotten?

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You can read this post, and other travel ideas over at the Wanderlust monthly link up!

Wanderlust

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2 thoughts on “Our Travel First Aid Kit

  1. Wow, what a huge list! I have to say, we don’t carry nearly anything like this when we travel!! Usually just band aids, baby neurofen, and some bonjella!

    And thanks for linking up with Wanderlust! Our next link up will be on the 3rd December, so mark it in your diary!!

  2. Travelling with acute allergies or chronic illness certainly adds to the complexities but it’s totally worth it. At least with domestic travel there isn’t a two page letter from the doctor to present and explain at immigration.

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