Sunday Roast – Sausage Sangers Evans Style

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Yeah, I know, it’s Tuesday. But we’ve had a hectic few days. We travelled to Rockhampton on Saturday, shopped and packed up a storm on Sunday and yesterday travelled to Calliope which, for about 120km journey seemed to take forever. We must have driven through (or sat at for a while) at least 10 sets of roadworks. But posting a Sunday Roast on a Tuesday is probably, like, a really apt metaphor for my life or something, so here it is.

The sausage sandwich. The snag sanger. Bangers on bread. Whatever you want to call it, it’s Aussie as. The only problem is, your usual humble snag contains about a million ingredients that Cai is allergic to.

Over the years, we’ve done some kilometres in search of a Cai friendly snag. We met a butcher at Maryborough who had a grandson with food allergies, and as a result he started making Failsafe snags. A health food shop in Hervey Bay used to order some in, along with nitrate free ham and bacon, once a fortnight for us from Brisbane. The first time he ever ate a sausage sanger aged 4, Cai proudly proclaimed that he was “just like all the other kids”, which was a pretty tear inducing moment I have to say.

We found a fantastic butcher in Brisbane last year who made Cai friendly snags and I’m pretty sure we were single-handedly paying his mortgage for a while there, until we realised that red meat was triggering Cai’s eosinophilic oesophagitis. So they went off the menu again.

I had mentioned that if we found somewhere on our travels that sold preservative and additive free snags that perhaps we would be able to give them a go, and ever since then Mackenzie has been like a dog with a bone. Every place we pull into, she asks, “are we getting sausages here?” I had thought I’d found a place in Townsville, they advertised them on their website but then didn’t actually have any. (Turned out they also sold crocodile meat so Cai wasn’t keen on us shopping there anyway.)

I put a call out in a Facebook group for possible sources as we moved down the coast, and found a Yeppoon retailer that had a market stall in Rockhampton on a Sunday. It was the first stall we saw as we walked in, and BOOM! Lamb snags in the cold cabinet.

They did have buckwheat flour in them which Cai would ordinarily avoid, but as a one off we decided to take our chances. He declared it would be worth a bit of reflux for his first sausages in almost a year.

Add some gluten free flatbread (easy as, 2 cups GF self-raising flour and enough water to make a pancakey batter and fry in a pan), and some pan fried onions and mushrooms, and it was certainly a Sunday Lamb Roast we’ll remember for a while. Definitely worth turning down a date with Tom Cruise. I didn’t manage any photos because it was scoffed too fast and also, well, not really that attractive, but the kids didn’t care. Because they were (almost) just like all the other kids.

Ever gone on a ridiculous food seeking quest? Or is that just me?

Budget Travelling – Frugal Food Update

When it comes to budget travelling, I think we might be as budget as they come. “How much does it cost?” is probably the question that we and other travelling families are asked most often. And obviously the answers vary pretty widely. But it doesn’t have to cost a bomb. We left home with $7000 and the income from renting out our home. I’m going to start exploring our budget in a bit more depth for you shortly, but for now, here’s an update on our not going to the shops every five minutes experiment. It’s going gangbusters. We’re on Day 10 today, and here’s what’s left:

3 GF Pasta
5L Rice Milk
500mL Olive Oil
1 pack wholegrain Sakata crackers
1 big and 3 small tuna
3 tins mixed beans
6 tins tomatoes
1 tin baked beans
5 tins assorted veg (corn, beetroot)
4 meat meals (2 bacon, 1 steak, 1 mince)
2 cups GF flour
Motherload rice
Assorted jams, honey, coffee, tea, popcorn kernels etc
2 onions, 2 cloves garlic, shallots, half a sweet potato.

That is a Masterchef mystery box waiting to happen, is it not? Realistically I think we could probably make it 14 days if we had more fruit and veg to pad things out, but as it is I think we’ll make it to 12 and then shop. Which is still much better than every 4 or 5 days.

I spent $340 last shop, which works out to $28.34 a day for a family of 5 and a dog. I’d estimate I’ve cut between $10 and $12 a day off our last few week’s food bills, which is enough to give us a bit of breathing room as we come into the parts of the coast where free camping isn’t as accessible. I’m pretty happy with that for a first effort, although there’s definitely a few things I’ll do differently this time.

I didn’t meal plan or make a shopping list.

I KNOW! I committed both of the cardinal sins of frugal shopping. Last time we shopped, we were going to buy either a freezer or a vacuum sealer, and I had no idea which so didn’t see the point in making a list. I also didn’t stocktake the pantry stores before we went either, so quite frankly I’ll be surprised if I’m kicked out of the talking about food on the internet club. This time, I have redeemed myself by making a fortnightly meal plan which is as scintillating as it sounds, but all jokes aside it is a sensible thing to do. Otherwise you find yourself in the position of trying to work out whether you can put tinned beetroot in a curry (I’m thinking no, right?)

The vacuum sealing worked well, but it does take practise.

My bag cutting minion cut the bags way too big, which is neither frugal or environmentally kind. You do need a bit of a gap between the food and the top of the bag, but we ended up with a bit of plastic waste which made me feel guilty. Also, I did have an air bubble or two which isn’t ideal, and although the food didn’t spoil we ate the same thing a couple of nights in a row to get rid of it before it did.

I didn’t buy enough fruit and veg.

I wasn’t sure how it would all fit in the 60L fridge, so opted for a few emergency cans as backup. Turns out I had plenty of room for fresh. I also struggled to find a good fruit and veg shop in our last location, which didn’t help, but we’re hoping to hit a market this weekend. I’ll buy a heap more this time, and vacuum seal some of that too.

I bought coconut milk instead of coconut cream.

Like a der-fred. Coconut milk is basically just watered down coconut cream, no? So half as many tins and use half coconut cream and half water. (This is why you make lists, people, and don’t just blindly grab stuff of the shelves while you cry.) (May or may not have happened.)

GOAL: 14 days under $400 – is someone playing the Rocky music or is that just me?

What do you spend on groceries? Any top budgeting tips you’d like to share?

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Sunday Roast – Mrs Tait’s Stewed Melon

It’s been a bit quiet around here this week. I’ve been battling with an unwell baby who seems to be having a reaction to just about everything she eats at the moment with lots of sore tummies and sleepless nights as a result. It’s a road we’re familiar with given Cai’s medical history, but even though we know where to go and what to do this time around, as a parent you can still feel pretty helpless.

So we didn’t do much this week. I did a lot of reading and thinking and planning, but that doesn’t always make for earth shattering reading! I did, however, finally get around to making Mrs Tait’s Stewed Melon.

Richard and Bernice have been great friends to us the past couple of weeks. Always good for a fishing tip or a beer around the campfire, they’ve raised and camped with their own kids and understand that sometimes the baby screams or the kids are ratty and there’s nothing you can do about it. Bernice pointed out all the melons growing wild near the campground. One of the other campers had given us a jar of jam made out of these melons last time we were here, and Bernice was experimenting with her own recipes. She was also stewing them, which Cai gave a big thumbs up so I thought I’d give it a go.

I still don’t know what sort of melons they are, but all the locals eat them and no one’s been poisoned yet. I made some tweaks to the recipe Bernice gave me, but seeing as how I don’t know what the melons are called, I’m giving the recipe her name.

And seeing as how you’ll probably struggle to find these nameless melons, swap it out for the stewing fruit of your preference (apples etc)
Also, there’s no really strict measurements as it will depend on how much fruit you’re using and your own tastes re the spices.

You’ll need
Your fruit – skins and seeds removed, cut into small cubes
Sugar – I used rapadura
Whole cloves 6 or 7
Raisins – organic sulphur free – 2 tablespoons
Cinnamon stick
Star anise
Rind and Juice of 1 lemon and 1 orange – I only had oranges so used the juice and half the pulp of 1
Fresh ginger finely chopped

Then you
Sprinkle your fruit with sugar, cover and leave overnight. Mrs Tait also soaks her raisins in brandy or port, but I left that bit out and they still softened up beautifully.

The next day, cook the fruit in own juices, adding your lemon and orange rind and juice and your spices.

Cooking method and time
Because we have small and expensive gas bottles for cooking, I try to use as little gas as possible. I did try bringing this to the boil and then finishing it off in the thermal cooker, but it does seem to need the more direct heat. Mrs Tait did one batch in her pressure cooker that came out quite well. In the end, I put my saucepan (no lid) inside the camp oven and hung that from the tripod over our fire which stewed it right down beautifully. It’s not the world’s fastest process, but luckily I don’t have anywhere else to be.

Cai was eating this just straight out of the jar, but you could add to breakfasts, yoghurt, custard, rice pudding etc depending on your diet.

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I didn’t add the final photo – it’s not all that glamorous really, but when it’s all brown and soft it’s all good!

Camp Cooking – More than Beans

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Thinking about food, preparing food and eating food take up a large percentage of my day. I know, life’s tough. But we’re faced with a few more food issues than your average travelling family, so it’s pretty important that we’re prepared like there’s an apocalypse imminent.

Cai has a couple of chronic health issues that necessitate modifications to a “normal” diet. First of all, he has anaphylaxis to cashews and shellfish. In order to best protect him from a serious episode, we also avoid items that “May contain traces of” these foods.

He also has a disease called Eosinophilic Oesophagitis which is almost harder to explain than it is to say. Basically, he has an infiltration of a type of white blood cell, called an eosinophil, in his oesophagus, and they’re not supposed to be there. When he eats (or in the case of eggs, smells) his trigger foods, he suffers from severe reflux and vomits up to 20 times a day, which can be very damaging to his oesophagus. Cai’s EoE is triggered by wheat, dairy, eggs, peanuts and soy.

He has also had severe reactions/asthma induced by the sulphite family of preservatives and MSG and other flavour enhancers. We generally avoid all preservatives, flavour enhancers and artificial colours to be on the safe side.

Cliffs Notes Version – that’s no
Nuts
Shellfish
Wheat
Eggs
Dairy products
Soy products
Preservatives
Additives
Flavour Enhancers

And on the whole, we all eat the same way. The girls have a few variations and I’m in the middle of an experiment with food and my own autoimmune issues but for the most part we all eat the same way. We figure our fridge is the only fridge in Australia that he can safely help himself in, and “giving up” whatever foods pales in comparison to having a sick little boy all the time.

The question we get asked most frequently is “well, what DO you eat?” And look, in all honesty we do have a core list of meals that are on pretty high rotation, but I think that was the case before the restrictions anyway, and I think it’s the case for most families. In some of the places we travel to, we can’t find rice pasta, or a wide range of wheat free products. And while I’d love to eat a wholly organic diet, it’s just not affordable or even available in remote parts of Australia.

We don’t have fancy equipment to help with our meal preparation. 2 of my saucepans came out of an $80 box we bought 7.5 years ago when we first moved to Queensland and none of them have handles. I was going to bring a stick blender, but Matt just wanted to bring the blendy bit and attach it to a drill to use it so I decided I’d rather do without. We’re rocking it old school, just with an allergy friendly twist.

As part of our adventure, we’re hoping to raise awareness for kids like Cai who suffer from Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders (EGIDs) and the charity who supports us, ausEE. One of the ways we can do this is by sharing some of our tried and true favourite recipes, which (I hope) will show you that there’s more to allergy friendly eating than pears and rice. And there’s a lot more to camp cooking than baked beans.

If you’d like to know more about EGIDs please visit ausEE Inc

What’s your favourite camping meal? Are you travelling with special needs? Let me know!